Is your New Year’s Resolution to get more exercise?

Do you want to improve your health by getting more exercise in the new year? Is it difficult to find the time to exercise during your busy day? Activate your commute and you’ll do both!

Make walking or biking a part of your commute to the U and your physical health will improve – and help clear our air. As you experience the benefits of walking or biking, also known as active transportation, you are contributing to a healthier community – both physically, socially and economically. Continue reading for more ideas on activating your commute… NEED LINK With active transportation a part of your lifestyle you save money on fuel, spend less time in traffic congestion and integrate physical activity into your daily commute. You also help reduce vehicle emissions that contribute to Utah’s poor air quality while reducing traffic congestion and demand for vehicle parking on campus.

University survey data indicates a majority of us live eight miles or less from our campus destination. Riding a bike is a great way to commute over short distances and keep you active during the day. Bicycling to campus means you have a free parking space, right next to your campus destination. Take your bike to the Campus Bike Shop for repairs, and make sure you ride on February 14th – it’s Winter Bike to Work Day and we want to celebrate with you!
 
If you are a commuter that drives alone in your car, rethink your trip and try public transit. Notice how you benefit from taking the bus or train– this is your personal time to read, listen to music, socialize or just zone out during your daily commute. If you live in Salt Lake City, you can also rent a shared scooter to access the campus. Just like a bicycle, shared scooters must be parked adjacent to an outdoor bicycle rack. When operating a shared scooter, you are responsible for following the University operating guidelines for devices on campus sidewalks.
 
Safety is key with active transportation. Plan your walking or biking route with the campus map and observe where all sidewalks, bikeways and crosswalks are located. Be aware of your surroundings, wear clothing that is easily visible to motorists, slow your speed on campus pathways and always give pedestrians the right of way.
 
So get outside and walk to the bus or train, hop on your bike, push a scooter or skateboard, or if you drive alone in your car, park farther from your destination and take a brisk walk. These are all great ways to improve your physical health and help clear our air, every single day of the year.

GROW FRESH FOOD ALL YEAR LONG.

By: Quinn Graves, Edible Campus Garden Steward.

Producing food in these final days of winter is hard enough due to chilly temperatures and low light. Put classes, schoolwork, job, skiing, and everything else we do and gardening goes to the bottom of the to do list.

Most posts about indoor gardening call for grow lights and controlled climates, but for many of us, we have neither the time nor money to set up a blissful indoor garden.

Do not fret! I’ve compiled three (almost) fool-proof foods that anyone with the desire to can grow food, inside, without grow lights or much effort.

Regrow green onions.

Green onions, among some other produce you may find in your kitchen, can be reused. If you use the top parts of the green onions, you can place the root ends in water and watch them grow. To do this, put the root ends of green onions into a shallow bowl. Make sure the ends are long enough not to be submerged (see picture). Every two to three days, change out the water and watch your green onions re-grow within a week.

When I regrow green onions, I only reuse them once. All plants need more than just water to grow and to provide nutrients, and if you regrow green onions multiple times, they will lose flavor and nutritional value.

Sprouting in a jar.

Growing sprouts is a great way to save money and to grow yourself a vitamin-packed jar of goodness. Check out this great tutorial on how to sprout seeds in a jar. Sprouting is super rewarding because a jar with a half inch of seeds will turn into a bounty of sprouts great for sandwiches, salads, or snacks.

Growing micro greens.

Microgreens are basically itty-bitty lettuces that pack a punch in the nutrient department. Growing microgreens is my favorite on this list. I love it, because I get to plant seeds in dirt and see the little greens emerge. Just like growing lettuce, but even easier! All you need is a little bit of soil, some seeds, a shallow dish, like a berry clamshell container, and a south-facing window to grow your greens in. This tutorial will give you guidance on growing your own microgreens.

There you have it! Three super simple, low-tech ways you can produce food in the warmth of your home.

Quinn is an undergraduate student and ECG steward studying Environmental & Sustainability Studies and Geography with an emphasis in biogeography and ecology. She loves to ski, venture around the world, and is a real-life garden gnome.

Cover Photo: “Beans day five- Kaos” by Lenore Edman is licensed under CC BY 2.0